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farroverrthemistymountains:

keepingkatiehealthy:

anchorsamour:

mybodypeaceofmind:

symphonyofawesomeness:

All these lovely ladies weigh 154lbs. We all carry weight differently, don’t live your life by an outdated chart. Find a number that looks and feels good.

TAKE A GOOD LOOK. WEIGHT COMES IN DIFFERENT SHAPES AND SIZES.

THIS ^ OH MY GOD the amount of times i’ve tried to get through to people about this!!! LEARN IT FOR CHRIST SAKE.

This is the perfect visual.

this is perfect!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

ludicrouscupcake:

tyleroakley:

thestrayline:

for christmas, i bought my brother an ipod touch. it’s his very first ipod so i’m sure he’s going to flip shit. but since he’s been a little shit for most of the year, i’m gonna make him work for it. the ipod in wrapped in 38 various layers of bags, boxes, tissue paper, and tape. i’ve also hidden every single pair of scissors we own in our house. let’s see if he wants to play a game.

Calm it down, JigSaw.

this is how you older sibling.

image

I want to share with you this exercise, that illustrates on a sentence-structure level how the way we think, literally the way we use language, conspires to keep our attention off men.

This is about domestic violence in particular but you can plug in other analogues. This comes from the work of feminist linguist Julia Penelope. It starts with a very basic English sentence: “John beat Mary,” that’s a good English sentence. John is the subject, beat is the verb, Mary is the object. Good sentence. Now, we’re going to move on to the second sentence which says the same thing in the passive voice.

"Mary was beaten by John," and now a whole lot has happened in one sentence. We shifted our focus from John to Mary and as you can see, John is very close to the end of the sentence, close to dropping off the map of our physical plain.

In the third sentence, John is dropped and then we have “Mary was beaten,” and now it’s all about Mary. We’re not even thinking about John. It’s totally focused on Mary. Over the past generation, the term we use as synonymous with beaten is battered, so now we have: “Mary was battered.”

And the final sentence in this sequence, flowing from the others, is “Mary is a battered woman.” So now Mary’s very identity - “a battered woman” - is what was done to her by John, but we demonstrated that John has long ago left the conversation.

Those of us who work in domestic and sexual violence feel and know that victim-blaming is pervasive in this realm. Which is to say, blaming the person to whom something was done, not the person who did it. And we say things like: “Why do these women go out with these men?,” “Why is she attracted to these men?,” “Why do they keep going back?,” “What was she wearing to that party?,” “What a stupid thing to do!”, “Why was she drinking with that group of guys in that hotel room?” This is victim-blaming.

There are numerous reasons for it, but one of them is that our whole cognitive structure is set up to blame victims. It’s all unconscious. Our whole cognitive structure is set up to blame women, women’s choices, what they’re doing, thinking and wearing - I’m not going to shout down people who ask questions about women, it’s a legitimate thing to ask. But let’s be clear, asking about Mary isn’t going to get us anywhere in terms of preventing violence. We have to ask a different set of questions.

The questions are not about Mary. The questions are about John. The questions include things: “Why does John beat Mary?”, “Why is domestic violence still a big problem in the United States and all over the world?”, “Why do so many men abuse women physically, emotionally and verbally, and in other ways, the women and girls and men and boys that they claim to love?”, “What’s going on with men?”

Jackson Katz, Ph.D speaking at TedxFiDiWomen

Jackson Katz, Phd, is an anti-sexist activist and expert on violence, media and masculinities. Katz is the creator and co-founder of the Mentors in Violence Prevention (MVP) program, which advocates the ‘bystander approach’ to sexual and domestic violence prevention.

(via survivorstories)

theyaimtospoopyhave:

rantyrantblog:

aghoulshark:

hmmm something’s wrong here…. just can’t put my finger on it

Literally every one of those women’s costumes have a “Yandy” watermark.  I’m going to flip my shit. How many times do I have to say it. 

YANDY IS A LINGERIE SITE. THEY SELL LINGERIE,  FOR WOMEN TO BE SEXY IN. FOR SEX. IT’S. WHAT. THEY. SELL.

THEY ARE NOT AN AVERAGE STORE. THESE ARE NOT YOUR AVERAGE CHOICES. STOP BEING MISLEADING. 

omfg thIS MEANS PEOPLE HAVE SEX IN SESAME STREET LINGERIE

(Source: skeletontrash)

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